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Nutrition: 4 Key Messages


Some people think that Nutrition is about eating the right foods and avoiding the wrong ones. It does not have to be that way. Keep these 4 key messages in mind to develop a better relationship with your food.


1. Intuitive Eating

Some people may think that intuitive eating means eating whatever you want, whenever you want. For me, it means knowing that one cookie makes me feel pretty good and happy. Eating a whole sleeve of girl scout cookies on the other hand, makes me feel like I want to lie down until tomorrow. Listening to the way your body responds to the foods you eat, and eating foods that give you energy and put a smile on your face is the essence of intuitive eating.


2. Weight is Not Worth

We have all done it. We step on the scale and watch as the number bounces above or below where we want it to be before stopping on a number that either makes us smile or feel bad about ourselves. But weight is simply a measure of how strongly the Earth's gravity pulls you towards it's core. It is not a reliable indicator of health and irrelevant to your worth as a human being. We are worthy of being happy and confident regardless of what number shows up on the scale.


Many students at BC are frustrated with their weight and/ or their relationship with their body/ dieting. At BC, there is a program called The Body Project designed for female identified students to help resist cultural body standards and improve relationships with food and their bodies. To learn more, click here.


3. Eat Whole and Fun Foods

Every day we want to get a variety of foods of all different colors ranging from veggies to desserts. Most "healthy plate" graphics won't leave room for "fun foods", but giving yourself permission to eat them is often more sustainable and enjoyable than a restrictive diet.


4. Get Enough Fuel

Being hungry during the day can be as detrimental to your productivity as being sick, or sleep deprived. In order to keep up energy throughout the day, college students need 3 meals and 2-3 snacks in between. It can be helpful to keep snacks like granola bars in your backpack for times when you can't make it to a dining hall.



Resources:


1. Schedule a Free Nutrition appointment with our on-campus Nutritionist, Kate Sweeney MS, RD.

- Click this link > Nutrition Appointment > Kate's Calendar


2. Participate in The Body Project

- Constantly thinking about how you look? Want to improve your relationship with your body? Feeling frustrated with dieting? Come join us at The Body Project and free your mind!

- Click here to learn more!






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For more information, visit bc.edu/healthpro or email us at healthpromotion@bc.edu

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